Stredná Európa

Italy’s Great Power Strategies in Central-Eastern Europe Between the World Wars: Cultural Institutions and Political Propaganda

Santoro, Stefano

This article addresses the issue of Italian penetration in Central-Eastern Europe in the interwar period, paying particular attention to the case of Czechoslovakia and covering primarily the tools used by Italy to assert its influence among the “heir countries” of the Habsburg Empire. Among these instruments, the article aims to highlight the importance of culture and propaganda, which alongside politics and economics, allowed Italy to compete with the other great powers for hegemony in Central-Eastern Europe.

Self-publishing and Building Glocal Scenes: Between State Socialism and Neoliberal Capitalism

Michela, Miroslav
Šima, Karel

In this article we introduce the theme of special issue focusing on self-publishing activities In Central and Easter Europe from 1980s to 2000s. The articles presented in this issue offer an interdisciplinary view on the history of independent publishing in both the late socialist and post-socialist periods. We would like to enrich the scholarly debate beyond the dichotomies of communism/capitalism, socialism/post-socialism, East/West and samizdat/fanzine, respectively.

Echoes of Central and Eastern Europe Underground Scenes in French Fanzines Before and After the Fall of the Berlin Wall

Etienne, Samuel

This paper scrutinises how alternative cultural scenes from Central and Eastern European countries have been represented in fanzines published in France since 1977. The study focusses principally on the geographical and temporal rather than the qualitative or cultural aspects of the question. Four countries clearly stand out, representing 57 % of the analysed corpus: Poland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Hungary.

Why Fanzines? Perspectives, Topics and Limits in Research on Central Eastern Europe

Šima, Karel
Michela, Miroslav

While we strive to develop existing research on fanzines in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), this article provides an introduction to the discussion about of fanzines and the specific historical contexts of CEE. This thematic issue aims to open a debate about CEE subcultures and alternative-press practices in the context of the relationship between the local and the global in contemporary history.

Medieval Dynasties in Medieval Studies: A Historiographic Contribution

Zupka, Dušan

The article provides an overview of the current research on the notion, idea and perception of dynasties in medieval Europe. It deals with a variety of studies and books that focus on dynasty and dynastic historical writing within Central Europe, as well as outside this region. The main goal is to provide a selection of examples of how the notion of dynasty can be used in current historiographic discourse. First and foremost, dynasty in medieval studies seems to be (to a certain extent) another intellectual construct applied to the period in question.

Rex eris, si recte facias: si non facias, non eris. Panovnícka moc a jej reprezentácia v stredovekej strednej Európe (10. - 13. storočie)

Zupka, Dušan

The study deals with the issue of royal and princely power and its representation in medieval Central Europe region between the 10th and 13th century. The main focus is placed on the royal power in Hungary, Poland and Bohemia. It briefly deals with the theories of ruler's power in the medieval Occident, mapping its origins in Roman and Biblical political thinking. Some of the main characteristics which shaped these theories were most prominently the concepts of ruler's sacrality, belief in his supernatural powers and notion of his indispensability in the medieval society.

Prijatie kresťanstva na poľskom, českom a uhorskom území v 9. - 11. storočí. Podobnosti a rozdiely v prijímaní kresťanstva a vo vytváraní vyššej cirkevnej správy

Kiss Gergely Bálint

The present paper studies and compares the beginnings of the Bohemian (Moravian), Polish and Hungarian Christianity. From the above-mentioned peoples Christianity must have reached the Bohemians (Moravians) and the Hungarians as a result of the missionary activity supported first by the Carolingian empire, and after its fall by the Eastern Frankish Kingdom. With the Bohemians (Moravians) it meant direct contact and conversion, however, the Hungarians were only indirectly influenced by Christianity (with the occupation of the Carpathian basin).

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