nationalism

The Nationalist Perspective within Slovak Communist Intellectual Thinking (1921–1968)

Hudek, Adam

This study deals with the idea of nationalism in the thinking of Slovak communist intellectuals from the early 1920s until the end of the 1960s. The variety of roles that national communism took during these decades are detailed, including an “intellectual exercise” in the 1930s, an ideological deviation in the 1950s, a program of national emancipation in 1960s and finally, the narrative of legitimizing the normalization orthodoxy after the 1968 Warsaw Pact invasion into Czechoslovakia.

Slovakness in the Making: The Concept of “Nation” and “National Literature” in the Works of 1930s Literary Critics

Nádaskay, Viliam

The study outlines the opinions on and sources of the so-called Slovak question in the interwar Czechoslovak republic amongst the writings of three Slovak literary critics: Stanislav Mečiar, Andrej Kostolný and Michal Chorváth. Each author stood for a different contemporary ideology; nationalist/autonomist, Czechoslovakist and communist, respectively.

From Slavic Leader to National Ruler: A Modern Discursive Construction of the Early Medieval Rulership of Pribina († 861)

Harvát, Matej

Pribina was a Slavic leader of unknown origin from the 9th century who was expelled by the Moravian prince (dux) Mojmir I. However, his rank in the territory north of the Danube before exile is a matter of an ages-long scholarly debate. This article presents an analysis of historiographic discourse which has resulted in the national scholarly construction of an early medieval, hypothetical Slovak/Nitrian rulership of Pribina.

Intellectuals and the “National Question” in Post-1918 Central and Eastern Europe (An Introduction)

Buzássyová, Barbora
Vörös, László

This article provides introduction and context for the papers published in the current issue. Seven case studies examine the conceptions of “nation,” national existence, national history and national art in the writings of influential intellectuals active in a variety of fields—historians, literary critics, artists and art critics, and a philosopher—in Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and their successor states throughout the 20th century.

“‘Tis with the Chalice that We’ll Defend Our Country against the Cross...” Analysing and Comparing the Contents of the Neo-Nazi Fanzine Skinformátor and the Utraquist Zine Kalich

Charvát, Jan

Fanzines simultaneously reflected the subculture’s ideological cleavages, including those within the far-right branch itself (disregarding anti-racist or apolitical fanzines). As the racist skinhead subculture formed in the first half of the 1990s, it split into the more-or-less open neo-Nazis, on the one hand, and the so-called Utraquist skinheads, with their ideological amalgam of nationalism, racism and authoritarianism, on the other. The Utraquist skinhead groups are a unique Czech phenomenon; they have no international counterparts and have thus far received minimal attention.

Race, Nation or People? Reflections on Magyarization by the Slovak Old School, Political Catholicism and the Hlasists

Szabó, Miloslav

The study deals with the impact of the racial discourse on the nationality question in Hungary during the age of dualism between 1867 and 1918. In particular, it is concerned with the images of the so called Magyarization produced by the Slovak national movement. In the 1870s and 1880s the Slovak nationalists tried to prove that the Slovaks who allegedly had belonged to the "Aryan" race could have not be assimilated by the "inferior" races as the oriental Magyars.

The Transformation of Local Power Structures and the Slovak-Hungarian Relationship in 1848; The Case of Turóc County

Demmel, József

The radical political system reform of the Kingdom of Hungary that took place in the spring of 1848 after King Ferdinand V. sanctioned the so called April Laws adopted by the Hungarian Diet had an important impact on the organization of local political elites. The April Laws endowed wider strata of the male population with political rights.

Hungarian Motifs in the Emergence and Decline of the Czechoslovak National Narrative, 1890–1930

Haslinger, Peter

This paper tries to analyze the development of discourse over the concept of Czechoslovakism, the official national narrative of the First Czechoslovak Republic. Within that frame, it focuses on the development of Slovak question during World War I. and the 1920ies. It will do so not only by trying to elaborate on the discussion on Slovak individuality within the national collective form a Czechoslovak perspective, but also will try to analyze the incorporation of "Hungarian" elements into the national narrative.

Advice on the Crisis Course in Medieval Scholastics or an Essay about Medievalists

Šedivý, Juraj

The author of this article notes that there are two groups of medievalists in Slovakia today – "the factographs" and " the annalists". One school usually doesn't recognize outcomes of the other and underrates them. According to the author this is not a correct concept for a historian, but it has attracted his attention as a phenomenon and therefore he examines dualistic and extreme perspectives of medieval historiography.

"The spirit is silent, only the raw flesh disports…": Anti-Jewish Stereotypes in the Ideology of Svetozár Hurban-Vajanský

Szabó, Miloslav

The study deals with the emotional history of Slovak antisemitism in the late 19th century. Inspired by the theory of Sander L. Gilman, it examines the role of the stereotypes of "race", sexuality and disease in the political thought of Svetozár Hurban-Vajanský who was the most influential Slovak ideologue in the 1880s and 1890s. The detailed analysis shows the impact of "race", sexuality and disease on Vajanský's perception of the nation-building processes in East Central Europe and their failure, respectivelly.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - nationalism