nobility

Officials, Landowners and Familiares: County Nobility in Transdanubia at the Turn of the 16th and 17th Centuries

Dominkovits, Péter

Counties in the early modern Hungarian kingdom despite of their particularities fulfilled much the same functions. However, research had shown that there were some counties that functioned on different principles, such as the special counties occupied by the Ottomans.

Barons and Magnates in the Kingdom of Hungary in the 16th Century

Pálffy, Géza

After the battle of Mohács, political elite of the Hungarian kingdom was apart from the prelates formed predominantly by aristocracy. They were represented by about fifty families who in the middle of the century owned 45-50 % of the country's land. Their members would hold the highest administrative and military offices, occupy prominent positions at the Diet, become leaders of the Estates Confederated against the Habsburgs, controll majority of the comes posts in the counties and with the help of their familiares practically govern the whole regions.

On the Ethnic Origin of the Magnate Clan Hont-Poznan (Hont-Pázmany)

Lukačka, Ján

Research of the oldest aristocratic clans in Hungary encounters several difficulties. Sources of the period until as late as the 12th century usually noted only names of nobles without any mention of their family affiliation, nor any other genealogical relation, such as father or grandfather. Therefore, genealogical trees of most Hungarian aristocratic families can be put together only from the 13th century. However, there are some exceptions, such as the Hont-Poznans, an exceptional family that is written into the early medieval history of Hungary.

The Social Stratification of Servitores and Their Career Possibilities in Western Transdanubia During the 16th and 17th Centuries

Varga, János J.

The period after the battle of Mohács saw significant migration movements from southern towards northern and north-western parts of the country. The research is delimited to the area bounded by the newly formed border - approximately in the line of the counties of Zala, Veszprém (Weißbrunn) and Komárom (Komorn). Areas behind this line served as a basis for recruitment of new effective troops for the battles against the Ottomans. Landlords in order to be able do protect their property and at the same time to fulfil their duty to defend the country, organised their own armies.

Nobility of the Metropolis of Kingdom of Hugary after the Battle of Mohács. (An Archontological and Genealogical Perspective)

Federmayer, Frederik

The research of nobility and lives of nobles in the Hungarian metropolis after the battle of Mohács has been rather neglected. The paper attempts to give a basic outline of the problem mainly from a genealogical and partly from an archontological perspective.

The Festive and Everyday Life of the Medieval Noble in the Late Middle Ages

Dvořáková, Daniela

The church or liturgical calendar was the crucial factor that influenced differentiation between everyday and festive days in the whole Christian Europe. Religious service divided a day into separate sections; feasts of the church did the same within a year. The church calendar has an ultimate influence on the way how medieval men would spend their days.

"Nobiles Unius Sessionis": An Explanation of the Medieval Concept

Neumann, Tibor

Medieval nobility of Hungary comprised about 4 to 5% of the country's total population. From the great part it was represented by lesser nobles with modest property. Among lesser nobles prevailed nobiles unius sessionis, i. e. nobles possessing only one "session" - piece of land. This group is often mistakenly considered as a separate social group and at the same time the lowest strata of nobility. From that reason they are frequently characterised as impecunious, poor or peasant nobles.

The Formation of the Nobility in the Medieval Kingdom of Hungary

Zsoldos, Attila

The paper analyzes formation of nobility as an independent social group in the early Hungarian kingdom. The first mention of the term "noble" (nobilis) appears in the sources of Hungarian origin in the Law 3 of the king Ladislas I. Persons designated in the contemporary society as nobles were people born into upper class and wealthy families, forming a group which would be nowadays termed "aristocracy". The appearance of the term "noble" is connected with social changes in the 70´s of the 11th century, when a group of extra privileged was extolled from previously compact group of freemen.

Loyal and Disloyal to the King

Herucová, Angelika
Hudáček, Pavol

In the Middle Ages a good relationship between the ruler and his people was built on loyalty (fidelitas). Loyalty to the king was also very important for the political order and preservation of the power of the ruler as well as his people (magnates, mounted warriors, bishops, abbots and provosts). The oath of personal fidelity, devotion and loyalty was a part of the ritual in strengthening the relationship between the lord and his man. In Medieval Latin the words fides and fidelitas had originally a religious meaning – believer, a Christian, and Faith.

Conflicts between the Town of Trenčín and Nobility

Bernátová, Viera

The author of the study analyses the conflicts between the nobility that resided in Trenčín (Trencsén, Trentschin) castle and the burghers living in the town of Trenčín. The conflicts were mainly based on economic issues such as the census, town tolls and fishing fees. Those had to be discussed and approved by the highest authorities – the royal council – or by the royal court. Despite all the problems, the conflicts were not insurmountable and thus the nobility cooperated with the town over certain issues.

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